25 JanOcho Tulum Boutique Hotel Owners File Lawsuit In Mexican Federal Court Over Seizure In December

A favorite destination of New York Times travel editors in Tulum, Mexico is closed to tourism for the holidays as U.S. owners file lawsuit over rightful ownership

Denver, Colo. January 7, 2010 — Denverite Ken Wolf, principal investor in Ocho Tulum, a 22-room boutique hotel in Tulum, Mexico, filed a lawsuit in the Mexican Federal Courts on Dec. 22, 2009. According to Mexican attorneys for Wolf, Teresa Jimenez and Octavio Guitierrez, Case 1939/09 to determine rightful ownership of the property seized by the Garza Ponce family of Monterrey, Mexico will be heard by Federal Judge Arturo Escobedo Ramirez in Quintana Roo.

The filing follows the seizure of the hotel on Dec. 1, 2009, when Mexican state police invaded Ocho Tulum, wearing flak jackets and brandishing automatic weapons, flushing guests and workers from the property. According to Teresa Jimenez, neither Wolf nor her firm received advance notice of the seizure. Jimenez says she was called to Ocho Tulum as the seizure was underway, and reports that she arrived on site with documentation that the land is properly titled to Kaya’s Maya Resort, with a lease allowing Ocho Tulum to operate its hotel, restaurant, spa and yoga center on the property. Uniformed police loaded the contents of the hotel onto two waiting semis before barricading the property with barbed wire.

Guests at Ocho Tulum found their holidays on this, one of the world’s most beautiful stretches of powdered sugar beach, cut short. The $5 million resort sits empty since the seizure.

Until this seizure, Ocho Tulum ranked as one of the Top Two destinations on Trip Advisor for Tulum. The 2-year-old hotel was featured in the New York Times Travel Section on Aug. 9, 2009 as a destination not to miss. To read the New York Times review of Ocho Tulum appearing August 9, 2009: peninsula/tulum/45143/ocho-tulum/attraction-detail.html?scp=3&sq=Tulum%20Ocho%20Tulum&st=tcse

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